Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have captured a striking photo of the peculiar galaxy SDSS J225506.80+005839.9.

This Hubble image shows a galaxy called SDSS J225506.80+005839.9 (visible in the center right portion of the image). Image credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble / A. Zabludoff.

This Hubble image shows a galaxy called SDSS J225506.80+005839.9 (visible in the center right portion of the image). Image credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble / A. Zabludoff.

SDSS J225506.80+005839.9 (J2255 for short) is located in the northern constellation Pisces.

Also known as LEDA 1180817, the galaxy is the result of an ancient cosmic merger between two galaxies.

“J2255 is a post-starburst galaxy, which is a product of galaxies that have merged within the past billion years,” Hubble astronomers said.

“This merger event drove gas to the galaxy’s center and created an abundance of new stars, of which the brightest are visible in the remnant galaxy’s core.”

“The visible shells and tails surrounding the galaxies are also a result of this merger event.”

“Residing far beyond our own Milky Way Galaxy, it is almost impossible to glimpse this galaxy without the assistance of Hubble, and, like thousands of similar faint and very distant galaxies, it was only discovered and catalogued in recent years,” they added.

“Many millions of galaxies still await our discovery as we build a wondrous picture of our night sky.”

The color image of J2255 is made up of observations from Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the optical part of the spectrum.

Two filters — the blue filter F438W and the red filter F625W — were used to sample various wavelengths.

The color results from assigning different hues to each monochromatic image associated with an individual filter.